Posts under category: sustainability


CORDIO at IPBES 7, Paris

CORDIO’s Dr. David Obura was a Coordinating Lead Author in the IPBES Global Assessment report launched in Paris on 6 May 2019. The assessment is the first of its kind to assess, from local to global levels, peoples’ dependence on nature, the degree of impact we are having, and to […]


Sand harvest impacts to Waa-Tiwi coral reefs

Sand-harvesting has been carried out from 8-27 March at 3 areas off the Waa and Tiwi coral reefs, Kwale County, Kenya (see map). Sub-blocks 3, 4 and 5 have been exploited, with greatest pressure at block 4. The findings of the report are summarized below, or click on the icon […]


Technology in IPAT

This article explores one of the three terms of the IPAT equation (see here) – technology. Population and affluence will be the subject of further articles. The original article was published on 20 March 2019 on the Millennium Alliance for Humanity and the Biosphere (MAHB) blog here. Please go to […]


Global footprint and sustainability

The “three horses of sustainability” – the IPAT equation provides a simple but powerful model for understanding the roles of population, affluence and technology, particularly from the challenge posed by the Anthropocene – how to reduce one’s personal or societal impact.


Launch of the WIO scenarios

  On 9 July 2018 the scenarios for the future of the Western Indian Ocean/East and Southern Africa were launched at the Science-Policy forum of the Nairobi Convention in Durban, South Africa.  


Ocean Awards 2018

    David Obura is one of four finalists in the 2018 Ocean Awards, a competition run by Boat International and the Blue Marine Foundation. In it’s third year, the Ocean Awards continue to recognise and reward those that share our commitment to fixing the largest solvable problem on the […]


Refilling the coral reef glass

David Obura’s editorial in the 22 Sept 2017 issue of Science magazine ‘is the coral reef glass half full, or half empty?’ emphasizes what we need to do to save and then rebuild coral reefs, rather than give up on them. Go to the Science issue page here, to read […]


Kenya’s blue economy – what now?

What Kenya’s government can do to protect, and benefit from, ocean resources . Kenya earns around USD$2.5 billion per year from its ocean – less than 4% of its GDP. This shows the potential for growth which could raise peoples’ incomes in coming years. But it won’t happen unless damaging […]